Are you looking for the “BEST” summer flowers?  A few words that should be helpful while shopping for the “BEST” summer flowers; thrives on heat, drought tolerant, perennials, reseeds easily, blooms freely, and flowers that are appropriate for Zones 6-8 (southeast).

The best summer flowers perform well throughout the summer so that you can stagger your flowers and enjoy colorful blooms all throughout the year.  They have good heat resistance so that they can keep their flowers vibrant.  While the best flowers are hardy, you’ll need to remove dead flowers to get the best performance.  North Raleigh Florist has listed below a few of our recommendations:

Summer Performers:

Black-eyed Susans are among the best summer flowers because of their love for sunny weather.  Although considered a wildflower, we often use black-eyed Susans in gardens for their bright color.  Because they efficiently reseed themselves, we treat them like perennials. Black-eyed Susans look much like daisies with flowers with brown or black centers and bright yellow petals.  They are heat tolerant and bloom during the hottest part of summer through autumn.  Texas Department of Horticultural Sciences advises that cut flowers, in water, will last six to ten days.  Black-eyed Susans attract butterflies.

Black-eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans

Coreopsis, or daisy, grows aggressively and is native to North America, so the flower has already adapted to the weather conditions.  It is one of the best summer flowers for beginners because the daisy is very hardy.  Clumps of coreopsis will grow nearly anywhere there is soil and sun.  Heat doesn’t bother it, and coreopsis self-sows prolifically, with new clumps appearing yearly, often in places far away from original plants.  These can be easily transplanted to different spots.  Flowering in late spring and continuing through early fall; coreopsis comes in orange, maroon, red and variegated types.

Coreopsis / Daisy

Coreopsis / Daisy

Salvia Splendens, this flower will not thrive well during mild summers.  Give them moderate water so that they can grow strong root systems.  This flower produces spikes with a red salmon color, and the Van Houttei variety produces maroon flowers mixed with scarlet-orange.

Salvia

Salvia

Daylilies, especially the Stella De Oro, can bloom for a very long period, from late May to the first frost, making them one of the best summer flowers based on their hardiness.  Daylilies can also take a beating during the summer without losing their flowers.

Daylilies

Daylilies

Calibrachoa Hybrids perform reliably during the summer so that you can plan your summer blooms.  Calibrachoa hybrids are like petunias, but hardier, producing small flowers that last a long time, including the entire summer.  If you have unusually hot summers, try planting the Tequila Sunrise, a flower with bright orange and streaks of yellow.

Calibrachoa

Calibrachoa

Mandevilla consists of about 100 species, mostly tropical and subtropical flowering vines.  Mandevilla is native to Central and South America and many Mandevilla comes originally from the Serra dos Orgaos forests in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  The genus was named after Henry Mandeville (1773-1861), a British diplomat and gardener.

Mandevillas develop spectacular flowers in warm climates.  The flowers come in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, and red.  As climbers, Mandevillas can be trained against a wall or trellis to provide a leafy green and often flowering picture of beauty.  Mandevilla is often grown as an attraction plant for wildlife.  Known animals and insects that frequent Mandevilla are butterfly, bees, beetles and hummingbirds.

Mandevilla

Mandevilla

Heat-Tolerant Flowers:

Portulaca (moss rose) is among the showiest and easiest of these types to grow.  Both single and double forms produce blooms of many brilliant hues.  Portulaca adapts to poor soil, and reseeds easily.  Portulaca is a succulent (holds water well) and great to put by a mailbox where you may not get out to water as often. 

Portulaca

Portulaca

Lantana thrives and flowers well in hot conditions, even growing in the narrow spaces between concrete and brick sidewalks.  Gazania blooms freely throughout summer, thriving on heat and drought.  It’s very effective in rock gardens.

Lantana

Lantana

Heat-Resistant Flowers That Multiply:

Yarrow is another field flower showing up in home gardens.  Also known as achillea, this plant spreads so prolifically that gardeners may find it a nuisance plant after a couple of years if it’s not contained.  It produces feathery, fern-like leaves and tall stalks with flower heads made up of tiny florets.  Yarrow is usually white or yellow but can also be found in pastel shades of pink and purple, and deep red or maroon.

Yarrow

Yarrow

Coneflower is a true prairie plant and welcomes all weathers and soil conditions.  It self-propagates well but stays more contained than other self-seeding plants.  Also known as Echinacea, this plant flowers in midsummer and continues through fall, sending out tall stalks with flower heads of drooping rosy purple petals surrounding bulbous orange-brown centers.  Coneflower can be found in additional colors of white, orange and maroon.  Dead flower heads attract finches, which favor their seeds. 

Coneflower

Coneflower

Statice, also called sea-lavender, statice has leathery, gray-green clumps of leaves at its base, with branching, almost leafless stems.  Its small, delicate flowers appear at the tops of these arm-like structures and are protected by a papery envelope.  Statice spreads easily and flourishes in hot, dry conditions and many types of soil.  It prefers full sun.  Flowers may be white, pink, purple, blue, lavender or rose.  We use cut statice often at North Raleigh Florist as a cut filler flower in floral arrangements.

Statice

Statice

Heat Tolerant Perennial Flowers:

Russian Sage, a woody plant, grows up to 4 feet tall, with spiky stems covered with blue-lavender flowers.  Foliage consists of tiny gray-green leaves.  It loves heat and needs very little water.  Russian sage blooms from early summer through autumn.  These do best if cut back to about 6 inches when dormant.

Russian Sage

Russian Sage

Verbena, grows about 10 inches tall and flowers may be many colors.  Use them as edging plants or in hanging baskets.  They do not need much care and over watering will damage them.  You will need to pick off dead blooms or they may stop flowering.  If that happens, clipping the top of the stems will promote new flowers. 

Verbena

Verbena

Veronicas, come in many colors and various sizes.  They have few problems and tolerate most climates.  Some varieties grow low and make good edges or borders; others grow in clumps up to 3 feet tall.  They bloom mid-summer through autumn.

Veronica

Veronica

 

Coneflower, described above, is also a heat tolerant perennial flower.

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